Why visit Petra? I ask, why not?

This vibrant red, white, pink and sandstone cliffs that faces pre- historic Jordanian city of Petra has loads of story to tell. When we had an opportunity to visit Jordan, some of us weren’t very keen on exploring the destination. Considering it would be no different than any other Middle East countries that we have been to. But the fact that Jordan had one of the most iconic landmark – The Petra made us rethink of the decision.

The drive towards Petra
The drive towards Petra
Miles and miles of sandy roads, eroded mountains in every direction you look towards in the rugged desert in the Kingdom of Jordan was once the capital of the Nabataean empire between 400 B.C. and A.D. 106. We were extremely fortunate to hire one of the best ever guide that you’ll ever meet. He was very passionate about the entire city and the story behind. 

Despite the fact that we arrived a little late, he was willing to take us in as his last customer of the day and patiently tell us the story hidden in every nook and corner of this red-rose city. Ensure you are prepared to walk at least for two hours or so. The way inside will keep leading you and keep you fascinated but the way out might get you a little tired and exhausted (if you are as lazy as I am when it comes to taking a walk).

This site remained unknown and undiscovered to the western world until the early 1812. UNESCO claims this property to be one of the most precious cultural properties of man’s cultural heritage and is easily in a lot of bucket lists of the travellers. 
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The entire trip of the lost ancient civilization was quite overwhelming, it will leave you wondering about what each structure carved on the towering rocks meant. Petra was once a flourishing city and hub of trade. As we kept walking the rocks kept going deeper further and was tunnel like – unfolding the extensive passageways. During your journey through the Petra you’ll find two kinds of tombs – The Nabatean and the Greco-Roman. When you look at the structures and the interiors you’ll eventually start identifying the differences yourself.

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The classification of the rich vs middle class vs poor are quite evident in the structures created back then. Petra declined rapidly under Roman rule and in an earthquake the preceded the decline destroyed many structures and buildings.

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The treasury is one of the most popular sites in Petra, it will leave you intimidated by the size. You’ll notice a lot of bullet holes on the face of the structure, that are a symbol of a once rumoured fights amongst the tribes that hoped to loot the hidden riches.

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The journey further down the route will take you to many more tombs and housing structures, some of which you can even enter and will notice how the tiny rooms were structured. Some of them with big courtyards while some of them had of their dearest one buried within the compounds. And like most Roman cities would have, there was an amphitheatre located right in the centre of the town.

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That’s not all in Petra, the Monastery, likely also a tomb, is the largest monument here.You’ll notice a lot of inscription on the rose red walls of the Monastery.


  
  
  
  
Finally, ensure you wait for the sunset to happen – well the walk down the road will ensure you are there until sunset. On your walk back, ensure relive all the stories that unfolded through this journey of Petra. Rest assured you will take back a feel of history and piece of civilization with you.

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If you are looking for a weekend itinerary, look no further and refer to one of my previous article here . This is probably the best you’ll explore in a couple of days. Want to experience Petra in an instance, check out this google map images which will take you to the lost city in an instant.

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10 thoughts on “Why visit Petra? I ask, why not?

  1. For me, Petra was an amazing experience. Of course, it had a few downsides, but the history and all those details, the grandness of the city itself… it was worth every little minor “flaw” – which actually had nothing to do with Petra itself.
    You’ve taken beautiful pictures. (:

    Liked by 1 person

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